We use it

This tense is used to talk about actions happening in a recent past and which relate to the present, it indicates in a way that the action just happened or has happened recently.

IMPORTANT

The specific time is not important since these actions happened at an unspecified time, so phrases like the following are used...

- Never

- Ever

- Many times

- Yet

- Already

- Just

- Recently

Subject + Have / Has + Past Participle form of The Verb + the rest of the sentence.

In this tense, the use of the auxiliaries

Have / Has

depends on the subject of the sentence.

If the Subject is or equals

He - She - It

we use the auxiliary "Has" + Past Participle of the verb.

If the subject is or equals

I - You - We - They

we use the auxiliary "Have" + Past Participle of the verb.

If the main verb of the sentence is regular, the past participle form is the same as the Past Simple, that is to say, we add -Ed to the end of the verb.

If the verb of the sentence is irregular, it is written according to the 3° column of the list of irregular verbs (Past Participle).

Examples

I have never flown in a plane.

(It is used the auxiliary "Have" since the subject of the sentence is I and the verb "Flown" is the past participle of the verb "Fly", which is irregular and figures in the 3° column of the irregular verbs list).

Tony has worked in many different places.

(It is used the auxiliary "Has" since the subject equals "He" and the verb "Worked" is the past participle of the verb "Work", which is regular and is written with -Ed at the end)

He has just opened the window.

They have already been to Paris.

Subject + Have Not / Has Not + Past Participle of The Verb + the rest of the sentence.

In the negative form, the same structure as in the affirmative form is used but you add "Not" to the auxiliary verb, writing...

Have Not (Haven't).

or

Has Not (Hasn't).

Examples

She hasn't studied for the lesson.

They haven't visited Australia yet.

My best friend has not worked with him.

They have not bought a new car.

Have / Has + Subject + Past Participle of The Verb + the rest of the sentence ...?

In the interrogative form, the auxiliaries

Have or Has

are written before the subject of the sentence and the verb is also written in Past Participle.

Examples

Have you learned Japanese?

Has she cooked the cake?

Have you talked to Jane?

Has Emily cleaned her room?

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